Celebrating 17 years

Paul Revere, Messenger of the Revolution

Paul Revere is remembered for his historic Midnight Ride warning colonists of the impending British Army attack. He also had an illustrious career as an engraver, silversmith, watchmaker and soldier.

Revere is noted for his engraving of The Boston Massacre, portraying the victims shot and killed by the British Military in an altercation on King Street on March 5 of 1770. Revere's reproduction of his print of the massacre helped spur the colonies to break their relationship with Great Britain.

Revere's reputation as an engraver on copper was wide-spread. In addition all agreed he was the finest silversmith sculpting and designing in the colonies.

As a peripheral character of the Revolution, Paul Revere represents the countless acts of those who advanced the cause of freedom. His famous ride immortalized by the poet Longfellow is an emblem for all the unsung acts performed by unsung men and women during that time. His famous ride on the night of the 18th of April, 1775, remained unsung, if not unhonored, for eighty-eight years, or until Longfellow in 1863 made it the text for his Landlord's Tale in the Wayside Inn.